Nurse Hall

It's Tick Time...

2021-04-28 13:01:06 sheila_hall

Perform Daily Tick Checks

Check your body for ticks after being outdoors, even in your own yard. Conduct a body check upon return from potentially tick-infested areas by searching your entire body for ticks. Use a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body and remove any tick you find. Check these parts of your body and your child’s body for ticks:

  • Under the arms
  • In and around the ears
  • Inside belly button
  • Back of the knees
  • Under the arms
  • In and around the hair
  • Between the legs
  • Around the waist

Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming indoors has shown to reduce your risk of being bitten by a tick.

Check your children for ticks, especially in the hair, when returning from potentially tick-infested areas. See the list above for the places on your child’s body to check for ticks. Remove any tick you find on your child’s body.

Check your clothing for ticks. Ticks may be carried into the house on clothing. Any ticks that are found should be removed. Placing clothes into a dryer on high heat for at least an hour effectively kills ticks.

What to Do If You Are Bitten by a Tick

Remove an attached tick as soon as you notice it. Watch for signs of illness such as rash or fever, and see a health care provider if these develop. For fully detailed information about tick removal, see the tick removal page.

Your risk of acquiring a tick-borne illness depends on many factors, including where you live, what type of tick bit you, and how long the tick was attached. If you become ill after a tick bite, see a health care provider.

Reduce Ticks in Your Yard


Modify your landscape to create Tick-Safe Zones. To do this, keep play areas and playground equipment away from shrubs, bushes, and other vegetation. Also, regularly remove leaf litter and clear tall grasses and brush around homes, and place wood chips or gravel between lawns and wooded areas to keep ticks away from recreational areas.

  • Provide a vegetation-free play area. Keep play areas and playground equipment away from away from shrubs, bushes, and other vegetation.
  • Use a chemical control agent. Effective tick control chemicals are available for use by the homeowner, or they can be applied by a professional pest control expert, and even limited applications can greatly reduce the number of ticks. A single springtime application of acaricide can reduce the population of ticks that cause Lyme disease by 68–100%.
  • Discourage deer. Removing plants that attract deer and constructing physical barriers may help discourage deer from entering your yard and bringing ticks with them.

Prevent Ticks on Animals

Prevent family pets from bringing ticks into the home. Maintain your family pet under a veterinarian’s care. Two of the ways to get rid of ticks on dogs and cats are putting on tick medicine or using a tick collar. Be sure to use these products according to the package instructions. For more information on animals and health, see Preventing Ticks on Your Pet.

Tick Removal

If you find a tick attached to your skin, there’s no need to panic. There are several tick removal devices on the market, but a plain set of fine-tipped tweezers will remove a tick quite effectively.

How to remove a tick

  1. Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible.
  2. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick; this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens, remove the mouth-parts with tweezers. If you are unable to remove the mouth easily with clean tweezers, leave it alone and let the skin heal.
  3. After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub, or soap and water.

Avoid folklore remedies such as “painting” the tick with nail polish or petroleum jelly, or using heat to make the tick detach from the skin. Your goal is to remove the tick as quickly as possible–not waiting for it to detach.

Follow-up

If you develop a rash or fever within several weeks of removing a tick, see your doctor. Be sure to tell the doctor about your recent tick bite, when the bite occurred, and where you most likely acquired the tick.

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Covid Fatigue

2021-03-16 10:51:16 edward_skutnik

At this point in the pandemic, people are tired of being cooped up due to restrictions on indoor gatherings outside the home. They are also tired of wearing masks, physical distancing, being away from family and friends, and increasingly fed up with the “new normal” routines. People are experiencing a type of burnout that experts are calling COVID-19 fatigue, which can lead to careless behaviors and a sharp rise in cases.

Here are a few ways for you and your family to overcome Covid-19 fatigue and stay safe.

  • Recognizing the signs of Covid fatigue
  • Focusing on what you can control
  • Maintaining hope
  • Creating schedules.

There are many other ways to help. Please access the link below other ideas and recommendations in detail.

We all want this to come to an end and we know that the best way to do that is to do it in a safe and measured manner.

Take care and safe!

https://www.ama-assn.org/delivering-care/public-health/what-doctors-wish-patients-knew-about-pandemic-fatigue

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If you feel stressed about coronavirus, you’re not alone. Coronavirus (COVID-19) has had ripple effects into almost every aspect of our lives. It’s affected the way we live every day. So much has changed in such a short time.

Designating time to practice mindful activities as a family will help everyone feel less anxious. It could be a daily family yoga session, or a quiet walk in the woods as a group, taking time to focus on the way the air feels, the sound of the birds and the smell of the trees. Another good family mindfulness idea is asking everyone to mention one good thing they heard or saw that day over dinner.

Mindfulness means paying full attention to something. It means slowing down to really notice what you’re doing.  Being mindful is the opposite of rushing or multitasking. When you’re mindful, you’re taking your time. You’re focusing in a relaxed, easy way.

Being mindful helps people do better in just about every part of life, like focusing on homework or feeling less stressed out. Practicing mindfulness a little bit every day helps you to build this valuable skill.

These exercises help you practice mindfulness in four different ways. Try doing all of them alone or as a family.

As you do each exercise, you will probably find that your mind wanders after a minute or two. That’s normal — minds do that. Your job is to gently bring your attention back to the thing you are focused on. The more you practice doing that, the better you train your brain to pay attention.

1. Mindful Eating

You can do this with an orange, an apple — or even something as tiny as a raisin. The idea is to really pay attention to what you are eating.

Let’s say you decide to do mindful eating with an orange. Your job is to eat the orange slowly, without rushing. You can do this mindful eating exercise with your eyes open or closed.

  1. Start by holding your orange. Roll it in your hand. Notice how it feels.
  2. Hold the orange near your nose. What does it smell like? Take a whiff of the bittersweet smell of the orange peel.
  3. If you have your eyes open, notice how the orange looks. Pay attention to whether the skin is smooth or bumpy. If you hold it firmly, is it squishy?
  4. Slowly peel your orange, paying attention to how it feels in your fingers. Notice the juiciness, and whether the inside of the orange smells different from the outside.
  5. Is your mouth watering? Go ahead and taste your orange. Notice how it feels on your tongue, and against your teeth. Notice the flavor, the texture, and the juiciness as you chew each piece slowly. Take your time as you chew, taste, smell, and feel each bite of your orange.

2. Mindful Breathing

With this exercise, you focus your attention on breathing. You want to pay attention to your breath in an easy way — on purpose, but not forced.

  1. Sit up in a comfortable way. Close your eyes.
  2. Notice your breathing as you inhale and exhale normally. Just pay attention to your breath as it goes in and out. Can you feel the place where the air tickles your nostrils?
  3. Pay attention to how the breath gently moves your body. Can you notice your belly or your chest moving as you breathe?
  4. Sit for a few minutes, just paying attention to your gentle breathing. See how relaxed you can feel just sitting, breathing in and out.
  5. When your mind starts to wander and think about something else, gently guide your attention back to your breathing.

3. Mindful Walking

This exercise is about paying attention to how your body moves as you walk slowly.

  1. To start, pick up one foot and take a step forward, in slow motion. Pay attention to how you naturally keep your balance.
  2. Now walk in slow motion, step by step. Notice how your arms and legs and feet move. Pay attention to how your knees bend and straighten, as you lift one foot and then the other, nice and slow.
  3. Breathe in and out, in time with your steps. See if you can keep your attention focused on walking slowly, step by step, as you relax and breathe.
  4. Whenever your mind wanders, gently guide it back to your s-l-o-w motion moving. Keep breathing, in and out, as you enjoy moving in slow motion.

4. Mindful Word

  1. Think of a word that seems calm or soothing. This could be a word like “peace” or “love” or “peaceful” or “snowflake” or “sunlight” or “hum” or “calm.”
  2. Think the word to yourself. Say it silently and slowly in your mind. Say your word to yourself with each breath you take, in and out. Keep your attention gently focused on your word.
  3. When your mind wanders, guide your attention back to your word, and keep saying it gently and slowly while you relax and breathe.
  4. Can you do this for a whole minute? Can you do it for 5 minutes?

When you practice, you will probably notice that you feel calm and relaxed. If you keep practicing, you might start to notice that it’s easier to focus your attention on things like schoolwork or listening. You may begin to feel calmer and more patient in your everyday life. You may find that when little things go wrong, you can handle them better.  There is more to learn.  Please check out the link below.

https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/mindfulness.html


Flu Vaccination Update

Dear Parents & Guardians,
Here is new information regarding the Flu vaccination reguirement for
for your children to attend school. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health is removing the requirement for flu vaccination for attendance in childcare/preschool, primary, secondary and postsecondary education as of January 15, 2021. Preliminary data show that this has been a mild flu season to date, presumably as people have received their seasonal flu vaccine and have been adhering to mask-wearing and social distancing due to COVID-19.  Given the intensive Commonwealth-wide efforts regarding COVID-19 vaccination, DPH wants to alleviate the burden to obtain flu vaccination and focus on continuing our COVID -19 vaccination efforts.

DPH continues to strongly recommend that everyone age six months and older receive their seasonal flu vaccine each year. 


Welcome back to the 2020-2021 school year!  

We have all faced many challenges over the past several months, and the school year has certainly been part of the challenges. Myself and the entire school staff are available to help support your child/children in any way we can.  Please don’t hesitate to ask for support and help along the way. 
We are all doing our best to support healthy behavior in school through performing the recommended strategies of the CDC; social distancing, wearing a mask and hand hygiene. These routines and reminders occur frequently throughout the school day.  Children learn best by role modeling, so please remind them and demonstrate these strategies at home to set an example for them.. 
Please have your child receive this year’s required Flu Vaccination and submit the vaccination certificate to the school as soon as it has been given.  December 31, 2020 is the deadline to be vaccinated.  Flu prevention will be especially important during the current pandemic.
Parents are encouraged to continue well-child check ups with your child’s primary care physician. Annual routine health visits will ensure your child’s overall health.  Physical exams, required immunizations, dental cleanings and care, and vision exams are critical for health and optimal learning for children.Physician offices have precautions in place to provide safe care. 
There is a great deal of information about the Covid-19 virus and can be accessed by clicking on the links below.  Please contact me at school at 978-249-2900, or by email; shall@arrsd.org, if you have any questions regarding Covid-19 or questions regarding your child’s health at school. 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html


Public Health Fact Sheets

We are now required to wear a face mask when leaving home! Socialdistancing and staying at home are the best ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19. But if you must go out, be sure to cover your face. Here’s how. For more information, visit mass.gov/COVID-19.
Mask and Face Covering Order
The Baker-Polito Administration has ordered all residents over the age of two to use a face covering or mask in public places where maintaining proper social distancing measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 are not possible. This statewide order went into effect on Tuesday May 6 th.
This order applies to all workers and customers ofbusinesses and other organizations that are currently open
to the public and permitted to operate as COVID-19
Essential Businesses, such as grocery stores, pharmacies,
and other retail stores. Residents are also required to wear
a mask or face covering at all times when using any means
of transportation service or public mass transit.

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Covid Fatigue

At this point in the pandemic, people are tired of being cooped up due to restrictions on indoor gatherings outside the home. They are also tired of wearing masks, physical distancing, being away from family and friends, and increasingly fed up with the “new normal” routines. People are experiencing a type of burnout that experts are calling COVID-19 fatigue, which can lead to careless behaviors and a sharp rise in cases.

Here are a few ways for you and your family to overcome Covid-19 fatigue and stay safe.

  • Recognizing the signs of Covid fatigue
  • Focusing on what you can control
  • Maintaining hope
  • Creating schedules.

There are many other ways to help. Please access the link below other ideas and recommendations in detail.

We all want this to come to an end and we know that the best way to do that is to do it in a safe and measured manner.

Take care and safe!

https://www.ama-assn.org/delivering-care/public-health/what-doctors-wish-patients-knew-about-pandemic-fatigue

What is Mindfulness

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