First Grade Mousekateers

First Grade Enrichment Activities

Welcome to our fourteenth enrichment page! I will be putting on some reading, writing, math, and science activities for you and your families to enjoy. Today’s date is June 10th and the following activities will be available through the 15th . All assignments need to be in by the end of June 15th , and grades will be out the 19th. I hope this message finds you all well and safe .

Reading/Writing

Writing

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A. Comprehension (Approaching Level)

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B. Comprehension (On-Level)

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C. Comprehension (Above Level)

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D. Sight Words

Play-Dough Writing

To set up this play dough writing tray we used rolled out three sections of play dough and set them out next to some tools that could be used to make marks. Grab whatever you have handy. If you don’t have anything, grab some twigs from outside. They’ll work perfectly!

Experiment with the different tools to write your sight words. Flip over each section of dough and smooth it out again to continue practicing more words and letters.

Where’s The Bear?

Label Dixie cups with sight words.  Then turn them over onto a tray and hide a bear underneath one cup. Then students take turns reading a word.  Pick up the cup of the word that was read to see if the bear is under that word.  Sometimes pick up a wrong word to see if they catch you.

Sight Words: a, and, are, can, who, all, call, day, under, other, small, find, food, start, caught, girl, boy, upon, grow, around, by, many, place, walk, away, now, good, pull, fun, make, two, to, too, there, new, help, live

E. Math

Writing Numbers to 100

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Race to 120 Game

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Math (Place Value)

I Spy

What You Need:

  • 12 pieces of white paper (you might need more if you’re playing with a group)
  • Crayons or markers
  • Tape

What You Do:

  1. Have your child divide up the paper so you both have an equal number of sheets.
  2. Tell your child that you are going to create your own I Spy game! To get started you’ll need to draw a picture on each piece of paper that has one or two numbers larger than 10 in the picture. Brainstorm about ways to include numbers in the pictures, such as speed limit signs, prices and mileage signs.
  3. When you have both finished your pictures, hang the pictures on a wall or door. Be sure to test a small area to make sure that the tape does not damage the paint on the wall.
  4. Have your child look at the pictures and make up an “I Spy” type riddle for you to solve using the pictures. For example “I Spy with my little eye, a number that is greater than 25 but less than 76” or “I Spy a number with a 7 in the tens place.”
  5. After you have solved the riddle, make a riddle for your child to solve. Continue playing the game until you have found most of the numbers in the pictures.
  6. Because this activity is different each time you play it, it’s fun to play over and over again. Be sure to store the pictures in a safe place so you can use them for another round of this game.

Color the Fairy

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F. Science

Clay Garden Relief Sculpture

What You Need:

  • Thick, sturdy paper such as cardboard or card stock. A reused cardboard box will work well.
  • Modeling clay in a variety of nature inspired colors.
  • Clay tools. These can be home made or home found items such as popsicle sticks, plastic forks and spoons, or toothpicks.
  • Pencil

What You Do:

  1. Go outside! If you do not have a garden try taking the art making to a local park. This is also a project you can do yourself right along with her, so that each of you can share in the creative process!
  2. Ask your child to take some time and observe the natural surroundings. Ask her questions like, “What do you see?”, “What shapes and colors can you find in the flowers and plants?”, or “How do you think you could draw those plants?”. Ask her to think of different words to use to describe what she sees around her.
  3. When your child is ready, give her a pencil to sketch a garden landscape or even a single memorable flower if she prefers.  Make sure the sketch is large enough so that she can use it as a guide to make her relief sculpture.
  4. Using the modeling clay, your child will create the relief portion of this project. Have her mold the clay into shapes that follow the lines of her garden sketch, making a three dimensional version of her drawing.
  5. Then help her firmly press the clay onto the drawing once she is satisfied with the shape she has made. The clay should stick to the surface of the paper. If it does not, or if it is too dry, try adding some glue underneath.
  6. Ask your child to add some different textures to her relief sculpture by using the clay tools to create some details (just as artists have done for centuries!) Encourage exploration and experimentation.
  7. Let the clay dry and then enjoy the homemade sculptural masterpiece!

Nature Prints

Before you start gather some bits and bobs from the yard, like twigs, flowers and leaves. Gather your materials. You will need some Play-Doh compound in various colors, and bits of nature from your yard, that you collected on a hike or a park. This whole activity could easily be transported to a park, just take a plastic or paper plate along for a base. Squish the Play-Doh compound into balls and invite your child to press nature bits into them. Carefully remove it. If you squish the print just try again! <— that’s the best part. You can just start over.

G. Social Studies

The White House

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The President’s Seal

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National Symbols

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i

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G. Social Emotional

Father’s Day Hike

  • Internet access
  • Printer and paper
  • Red pen
  • Measuring tape or ruler
  • Markers for decorating the map (optional)
  • Nuts, dried fruit, chocolate chips, or other ingredients for trail mix (optional)
  • Small reusable container (optional)

What You Do:

  1. Have your child look up Google Maps online, then search for your home by typing in your address.
  2. Switch to Satellite View to see your home and the surrounding terrain. Zoom in as needed.
  3. Print out the Satellite View of your home and the surrounding area. Take note of the scale in the lower left-hand corner of the map.
  4. Ask your child to use the red pen to draw a path on the map starting at your front door, trailing through the neighborhood and to nearby parks or woods, then looping around back home. Encourage your child to use markers to decorate the map and add local landmarks.
  5. Have your child use the map’s scale to measure the length of the trail. They can do this by placing a string along the trail, measuring the length of the string, then comparing it to the scale. Have them write the total length of the trail on the map.
  6. Ask them to estimate how long they think it will take to walk the trail. Have them record their estimate on the map.
  7. On Father’s Day, encourage your child to gift Dad the map and explain to him how they chose the trail and mapped out the hike.
  8. To prepare for the hike, check the weather report and dress accordingly. Put on good walking shoes and be mindful of the wildlife or other  possible hazards in your area. Consider wearing sunscreen and bug spray, and pack plenty of water.
  9. Make your own trail mix to take with you by mixing chocolate chips, nuts, dried fruit, or other items together in a reusable container.
  10. Have your child time the hike and compare the actual time to their estimate. Did they guess correctly?

Kindness Bear Puppet

What You Need:

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H. Parent Resources

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