Graphic Novels: Real Books or Not?

Are graphic novels real books? Do they belong in a classroom curriculum? First let’s investigate the question, what is a graphic novel? Despite common misconceptions, a graphic novels is “in fact an art form that can deal with mature subjects” (James Carter).  A graphic novel is a visual way to depict a scover_imagetory. This concept could have many implications to the classroom curriculum in today’s society. One common problem that graphic novels can improve is giving a visual to the readers. Many students have the “Inability to visualize. Based on brain research, about eight percent of students cannot visualize during reading…Instead of fighting to create mental pictures, the child can focus on constructing meaning and comprehending the plot of the story.” (Allyson Lyga).  Graphic novels can also help the many reluctant readers discover the motivation to read. It is said that “The blending ofart and text and the excitement and sophistication of the stories motivate students to read and engage their attention…those students become transformed by the experience and they feel successful with the act of reading” (Allyson Lyga). To further convince you of the good implications, many novels in the school curriculum have already been made into graphic novels. The novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, was remade in a graphic novel format and is said to be “…‘utterly true’ to the original. This wonderful reinvention will bring the novel to life in an exciting new way, to be revisited by those who already love it and also making it more accessible to new and perhaps more reluctant readers too” (Fred Fordham). Graphic novels have proved themselves to be real books and they are making it very easy to be incorporated into the classroom curriculum. Multiple trademark novels in the curriculum have been made into graphic novels making them easier to read and more understandable for students. In today’s society, graphic novels have a very important role in the progression of the classroom and the students involved.

 

 

 

Sources:

Lyga, Allyson. “Bringing Graphic Novels into the Classroom.” ForeWord, Jan.-Feb. 2007. Academic OneFile, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A163247665/GPS?u=mlin_c_atholhs&sid=GPS&xid=08617761. Accessed 2 Nov. 2018.

Carter, James Bucky. “Going graphic: understanding what graphic novels are – and aren’t – can help teachers make the best use of this literary form.” Educational Leadership, Mar. 2009, pp. 68-72. General OneFile, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A197743999/GPS?u=mlin_c_atholhs&sid=GPS&xid=44d09e6f. Accessed 31 Oct. 2018.

“Harper Lee (adapted and illustrated by Fred Fordham): To Kill a Mockingbird–Graphic Novel.” The Bookseller, 15 June 2018, p. 26. Business Collection, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A543465969/GPS?u=mlin_c_atholhs&sid=GPS&xid=25088eb4. Accessed 5 Nov. 2018

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